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. >>> how close? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybo
deeper, that fact into this plot tonight. joining us right now is "washington post" reporter sauer ri horowitz, and david woods senior military correspondent for "the huffington post." give me a sense, i don't want people to get lost before we start, let me take may own shot at this, how the whole thing is put together. let's watch. the messy and complex web begins with david petraeus. in 2006 petraeus meets paula broadwell, a west point graduate and doctoral student after giving a speech at harvard. fast forward to may of this year. another woman, jill kelley, a friend of petraeus and his wife, begins receiving harassing e-mails. she asks a friend at the fbi to help launch an investigation. the e-mails it is eventually discovered are being sent by broadwell. the fbi also discovers that broadwell and petraeus have been having an affair. meanwhile, the fbi agent who kelley approached gross frustrated after he's kept off the case. his supervisors reportedly are concerned that he has, quote, grown obsessed with the matter. it's also uncovered that he has sent shirtless photos of himself
's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with simple, undeniable facts. the president of the united states has the right and duty to select the secretary of state, the person he thinks will best help him shape and project this country's foreign policy. just as important, the senate has the duty to advise and consent to his decision. if senators see a serious problem with a nominee, they have a right and duty to speak and vote that way. someone keeps telling the press that president obama prefers to nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice, and as long as that person is not the president and does so under ground rules that protect his or her identity, we are condemned to this preventative war we're watching in washington. one side attacking while no one outside the gates of the white house knows what the president intends. i take president obama at his official word. he has not decided whose name to send to the senate, and with that we go to the first of our two senatorial guests, senator bob corker, republican of tennessee. senator corker, i
-seltzer on facebook. >>> they thought they had it. let's play "hardball." hi i'm chris in washington, let me start with this. when a political party gets beat the knifes come out, first you blame the candidate. next you blame the campaign just as easy. if you lose everything was wrong, like shooting fish in a barrel, blame everything. the hard part is figuring out the did you go too wide and thin or too narrow and tough? did you broad widely that you stood for nothing or did you circle the wagon so tightly that you left out country? the republican di immigration policy or too moderate? one thing you can never be wrong on. if you lose you can't brag. if you lose everybody gets it and nobody will admit she's wrong or he's wrong. both analysts joy, you first then john jump in. it seemse trial balloons for nextime 2016, the twotions in thes people like rubio, down in florida talking about t seven days of creatagain. then you've other endworld, you've got chris christie talking about how many days will it take us to c the mess secular real world and one off in the id world tha
. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. the hurricane and this president. hemingway called it grace under pressure, the highly educated call it good government. the american people who count the most call president obama's handling of tropical storm sandy positive. 4 out of 5 give him good marks as first responder in the crisis. the question before the election is whether this huge story about disaster and executive response is the last big one before we vote. is it the october surprise? the black swan that swoops out of nowhere and changes everything? as scarlet o'hara said, there's always tomorrow. chuck todd is nbc's political director and john heilemann is "new york magazine's" national affairs editor and an msnbc analyst. i guess that's my question to start, but let me give you this first. the president this afternoon bagged a big endorsement, new york mayor mike bloomberg, who is always interesting to watch. he cited the president's stance on climate change as the major reason. he writes, quote, one believes a woman'
on the outskirts of the washington metropolitan area in virginia and i was impressed by the methodical nature of what they did and also the distributed nature of what they did. in other words, everybody didn't come to headquarters. the materials, the lists, the walking lists and so forth were all in homes around the region. in other words, people in their individual homes and neighborhoods became the effective campaign headquarters for those areas. they have built on what they did in 2008. they do have a superb ground game. it's going to depend on them getting their own people out in all of these states. they have it divided in terms of types of voters. they have it divided by location. the analogy i use goes to the way the israelis operate in the desert. they don't have a lot of water, but they drop a droplet of water on every seed. the romney campaign theory is the older fashioned wave tv advertising, psychology, tie goes to the challenger situation. but it's such a closely divided country where everybody is microtargeting. maybe that old wave theory just doesn't operate anymore. certainly
it comes to building different and better coalitions in washington, finding his own versions of moderate republicans to come with him. the question is, did he learn lessons if he wins a second term? and maybe are there better ways of building coalitions outside of washington, trying to go to certain places and certain states and trying to overperform in certain states. >> if he wins on tuesday night, he was able to get support because of things he did, killing bin laden, helping out hispanic kids brought to this country at an early age, these are things he did, the thing he did with governor christie the other day, these are actual doing things. >> i think the lesson is, if he wins one of the top two or three factors will be the auto rescue. that is key to ohio. if he keeps ohio, it's because of the automobiles and the fact that you can see automobiles on the street. you can see chrysler and dodge cars on the street. that's tangible and that is probably his best piece of tangible legislation. >> the one thing that you're getting at here, chris, what smir conish found out the hard way, th
in washington. let me start with this, when a political party gets beat the knives come out. first you blame the candidate, that's the easy part. next you blame the campaign. that's just as easy if you lose, everything was wrong. like shooting fish in a barrel, blame everything. the hard part is figuring out the basics. did you go too wide and thin or too narrow and tough? did you broaden your appeal so widely that you stood for nothing or did you circle the wag son tightly that you left out a majority of the country? that's the question that may take the republicans now four years to answer. did we go too right on taxes and immigration and foreign policy or where were too moderate, not ideological enough? one thing you can never be wrong on, if you lose you can't brag. if you lose, everything gets it, everything you did and nobody will admit he or she is wrong. gee reid managing editor of the grio. joy, you first and john jump m in here. seems like if you look at the trial balloons for 2016 you see the two directions of the party. people like rubio, down in florida, who's talking about the
in washington but is his influence on the wane? >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. made tennesseans aware, i was just elected, the only thing i'm honoring is the oft i take when i'm sworn in this january. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece and republicans should put revenue on the table. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country, only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the -- supported a declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack jan today. the world has changed. >> that's a hell of a comparison. this morning norquist responded. let's listen. >> they all said that two years ago when we wereaing over the debt ceiling limits. so their position hasn't changed, and during the debt ceiling limit we cut spending, we didn't raise taxes. so other republicans did not listen to peter king or these others. >> and this guy is a political l
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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